ABOUT DOMAIN NAMES

The most common types of domain names are hostnames that provide more memorable names to stand in for numeric IP addresses. They allow for any service to move to a different location in the topology of the Internet (or an intranet), which would then have a different IP address. By allowing the use of unique alphabetical addresses instead of numeric ones, domain names allow Internet users to more easily find and communicate with web sites and other server-based services.

By allowing the use of unique alphabetical addresses instead of numeric ones, domain names allow Internet users to more easily find and communicate with web sites and other server-based services. The flexibility of the domain name system allows multiple IP addresses to be assigned to a single domain name, or multiple domain names to be assigned to a single IP address. This means that one server may have multiple roles (such as hosting multiple independent Web sites), or that one role can be spread among many servers. One IP address can also be assigned to several servers, as used in anycast and hijacked IP space.

Hostnames are restricted to the ASCII letters "a" through "z' (case-insensitive), the digits "0" through "9", and the hyphen, with some other restrictions. Registrars restrict the domains to valid hostnames, since, otherwise, they would be useless. The Internationalized domain name (IDN) system has been developed to bypass the restrictions on character allowances in hostnames, making it easier for non-english alphabets to use the Internet. The underscore character is frequently used to ensure that a domain name is not recognized as a hostname, for example with the use of SRV records, although some older systems, such as NetBIOS did allow it. Due to confusion and other reasons, domain names with underscores in them are sometimes used where hostnames are required.

The following example illustrates the difference between a URL (Uniform Resource Locator) and a domain name:

URL: http://www.example.net/index.html
Domain name: www.example.net
Registered domain name: example.net

As a general rule, the IP address and the server name are interchangeable. For most Internet services, the server will not have any way to know which was used. However, the explosion of interest in the Web means that there are far more Web sites than servers. To accommodate this, the hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP) specifies that the client tells the server which name is being used. This way, one server with one IP address can provide different sites for different domain names. This feature goes under the name virtual hosting and is commonly used by Web hosts.

For example, as referenced in RFC 2606 (Reserved Top Level DNS Names), the server at IP address 192.0.34.166 handles all of the following sites:

example.com
www.example.com
example.net
www.example.net
example.org
www.example.org

When a request is made, the data corresponding to the hostname requested is served to the user.

Every domain name ends in a top-level domain (TLD) name, which is always either one of a small list of generic names (three or more characters), or a two characters territory code based on ISO-3166 (there are few exceptions and new codes are integrated case by case). Top-level domains are sometimes also called first-level domains.
Domain Sell Buy Hot Domain Buy Hot Domain Buy Hot Domain
Google
www.PraxisXml.com
Domain Name Info
Visit Our Sponsors
Excel VBA Tutorial
Excel Business Directory
Bois Games (2800+ Games)
The NY Mets Site
The NY Yankees Site
The Domain City
Excel Conulting Services
XL Macros
Excel Modeling
Domain Names For Sell Domain Names For Sell
Home
More Resource
Contact Us
PraxisXml.com
More
Excel Consulting Services
Excel VBA Programs
Domain Names For Sell
Focusing on XML since its inception in 1997, Praxis lives and breathes XML technology. Leverage this experience using our Distributed Development model to stay ahead of the technology curve...and your competition. You'll soon see why leading B2B players like Commerce One have chosen Praxis to help them turbocharge their XML development projects.

About Extensible Markup Language (XML)

The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a general-purpose markup language. Its primary purpose is to facilitate the sharing of data across different information systems, particularly via the Internet.

It is a simplified subset of the Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML), and is designed to be relatively human-legible. By adding semantic constraints, application languages can be implemented in XML. These include XHTML, RSS, MathML, GraphML, Scalable Vector Graphics, MusicXML, and thousands of others. Moreover, XML is sometimes used as the specification language for such application languages.

XML is recommended by the World Wide Web Consortium. It is a fee-free open standard. The W3C recommendation specifies both the lexical grammar, and the requirements for parsing.

Well-formed and valid XML documents
There are two levels of correctness of an XML document:

Well-formed. A well-formed document conforms to all of XML's syntax rules. For example, if an element has an opening tag with no closing tag and is not self-closing, it is not well-formed. A document that is not well-formed is not considered to be XML; a conforming parser is not allowed to process it.
Valid. A valid document additionally conforms to some semantic rules. These rules are either user-defined, or included as an XML schema. For example, if a document contains an undefined tag, then it is not valid; a validating parser is not allowed to process it.

The specification requires that processors of XML support the pan-Unicode character encodings UTF-8 and UTF-16 (UTF-32 is not mandatory). The use of more limited encodings, such as those based on ISO/IEC 8859, is acknowledged and is indeed widely used and supported.
Created since 2000
eXTReMe Tracker
Your Online Superstore
Copyright The Domain City.  In affiliation with BUY.sc.  All Rights Reserved.